I am very interested in Amish fiction, but I am kind of a wimp about buggy crashes, or too much death and sadness. So I gave up on reading them because it seemed like the authors always used that to bring excitement to what would otherwise be a rather plain life. I'm interested in the simple joys and trials of life. What would you say are the gentlest Amish books you have read? Something more along the lines of the Little House books where the troubles are usually related to crop failure etc. instead of tragedy...
Years ago, Emma Keim's husband Sanford passed away, leaving her heartbroken and alone to raise her three daughters. Her family hasn't been quiet about the fact that they expect her to stay a window, but meeting Jay Hilty a fellow single parent and widower, changes something within her. Jay feels it too. Watching his oldest son become engaged and the joy it brings him makes Jay question if it's time to finally move on.
Isaac Byler grew up in the Amish community of Zebulon, Minnesota. Because their community doesn't have the rumspringa common in other communities, it means Isaac will soon need join the church and find a woman to marry, something that just feels wrong to him for unexplained reasons. David Lantz is left supporting his mother and sisters after tragedy strikes. When he takes Isaac on as his apprentice, an attraction grows between them and they will be forced to reconcile their feelings and their faith.
My grand daughter, jessie, got me started with the Amish Christian fiction; now i am an addict for sure! Get them from the library site online and son picks them up for me. Read ALL Beverly Lewis books and keep adding more and more authors to my list. My favorite type of book; keeps my mind cleaned out and more healthy and on things of the Lord; keeps my mind off my troubles and off my self pity. lol.
While primarily written for and marketed to adult readers, some young adult Amish romance titles have been published as well.[3] According to a September 2013 Library Journal survey, Amish fiction is the most commonly carried subgenre of Christian fiction in public libraries, although the survey did not distinguish between Amish romance and other Amish-themed literature.[7]
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