Some[who?] argue that the non-Amish authors fail to understand Amish theology and how it differs in key areas from mainstream Christianity. They thus present characters who may appear Amish but who maintain an evangelical Christian worldview. For example, a character might proclaim an assurance of salvation, rather than a "living hope" of such as the Amish do. Amish specific beliefs such as non-violence, non participation in government, and an unwillingness to proselytize may be glossed over or not mentioned. Evangelical themes, such as sexual purity, are substituted.[citation needed]
It's difficult being different in the Amish community, something Sarah and Miriam know all too well. Once, Sarah fell in love with an English woman and, realizing what that meant, withdrew into herself until Miriam walked into her life. Miriam was torn between trying to love a man she saw only as a brother and attempting figuring out what her heart truly wanted. Lesbians in the Amish community end up shunned, but that's a risk they're willing to take to be together.

I am very interested in Amish fiction, but I am kind of a wimp about buggy crashes, or too much death and sadness. So I gave up on reading them because it seemed like the authors always used that to bring excitement to what would otherwise be a rather plain life. I'm interested in the simple joys and trials of life. What would you say are the gentlest Amish books you have read? Something more along the lines of the Little House books where the troubles are usually related to crop failure etc. instead of tragedy...
Many readers do enjoy reading what's unfamiliar to them. That's why genres like fantasy and science fiction are so popular - because the reader gets to experience something they wouldn't otherwise experience. With Amish romance, readers get to take a journey to a life they're unfamiliar with, without the constraints of modern technology to get in the way of human relationships.
Most works of Amish romance have protagonists with socially conservative values, especially chastity, who engage in romance in ways which are socially and religiously acceptable in their communities.[5] Similar works may also feature other religious minorities, such as Mennonites, Shakers, or Puritans. Unlike many mainstream romance novels, Amish romance novels do not rely on the portrayal of sex and most other forms of physical intimacy.[2] "Despite the suggestion by some that the appeal of Amish fiction must lie in the arousal of coverings coming off, or suspenders being suspended — hence the coy industry term 'bonnet rippers' — most Amish novels are as different from Fifty Shades of Grey as a cape dress is from a spiked collar."[5]
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