Many years ago, Henry Yoder betrayed the Stoltzfus family and Leah Stolzfus, try as she might, has never forgiven him for it. Henry comes back into her life, claiming to be a changed person and vows to show Leah just how different he truly is. After Leah discovers a dark family secret, Leah relies on Henry to get her through it. Henry is determined to make amends and start over with her, but Leah isn't sure if she's ready yet. Even if she wants to be.
Joanna Kurtz, always the bridesmaid, never the bride. For now. Joanna has a few secrets of her own that she tries to keep under wraps. Like the fact that she loves to write and desperately wants to be published, something that just isn't done in her Pennsylvania community. She also has someone courting her that no one knows about, a secret she holds close to her heart. Eben Troyer lives in the Shipshewana, Indiana Amish community and since his only brother joined the English world, it's up to him to take over the farm. Will he and Joanna ever be together?

Julia Bradford thought the worst day of her life was the day her son witnesses a gang shooting, forcing them to enter witness protection. Living with Abraham King on his Amish farm is a huge change for Julia, but she finds herself drawn to their peaceful way of living. And to Abraham. The actual worst day of Julia's life is when her family gets tracked down by those that wish to harm them. Will they survive...together?


If you write Amish fiction and would like to be added to this list, we accept any names of authors who are published according to the ACFW criteria for recognized publishers. If you believe you or someone you know meets these standards and would like to be added to the list, please e-mail me, [email protected] Please include a .jpg of the book cover of your first release and a link to your website.

While primarily written for and marketed to adult readers, some young adult Amish romance titles have been published as well.[3] According to a September 2013 Library Journal survey, Amish fiction is the most commonly carried subgenre of Christian fiction in public libraries, although the survey did not distinguish between Amish romance and other Amish-themed literature.[7]
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