Julia Bradford thought the worst day of her life was the day her son witnesses a gang shooting, forcing them to enter witness protection. Living with Abraham King on his Amish farm is a huge change for Julia, but she finds herself drawn to their peaceful way of living. And to Abraham. The actual worst day of Julia's life is when her family gets tracked down by those that wish to harm them. Will they survive...together?
I am very interested in Amish fiction, but I am kind of a wimp about buggy crashes, or too much death and sadness. So I gave up on reading them because it seemed like the authors always used that to bring excitement to what would otherwise be a rather plain life. I'm interested in the simple joys and trials of life. What would you say are the gentlest Amish books you have read? Something more along the lines of the Little House books where the troubles are usually related to crop failure etc. instead of tragedy...
Joanna Kurtz, always the bridesmaid, never the bride. For now. Joanna has a few secrets of her own that she tries to keep under wraps. Like the fact that she loves to write and desperately wants to be published, something that just isn't done in her Pennsylvania community. She also has someone courting her that no one knows about, a secret she holds close to her heart. Eben Troyer lives in the Shipshewana, Indiana Amish community and since his only brother joined the English world, it's up to him to take over the farm. Will he and Joanna ever be together?
Many readers do enjoy reading what's unfamiliar to them. That's why genres like fantasy and science fiction are so popular - because the reader gets to experience something they wouldn't otherwise experience. With Amish romance, readers get to take a journey to a life they're unfamiliar with, without the constraints of modern technology to get in the way of human relationships.
Amish romance is a literary subgenre of Christian fiction featuring Amish characters, but written and read mostly by evangelical Christian women. An industry term for Amish romance novels is "bonnet rippers" because most feature a woman in a bonnet on the cover, and "bonnet ripper" is a play on the term "bodice ripper" from classic romance novels.[1]
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