Middlebury, Indiana is home to an Amish Artisan Villiage, and Amber Wright, owner of the shops, gets a call that the manager of the coffee shop, Ethan, is dead. Shaken, Amber has to eventually hire a new manager and find Hannah Troyer, a young Amish woman. They quickly become friends and it doesn't take long before they begin looking into Ethan's mysterious death themselves. Running into a lot of dead ends, secrets, and a little romance, Amber and Hannah won't stop until Middlebury's secrets reveal themselves.
As a genre Amish romance novels have flourished over the last decade and a half. Wanda Brunstetter, writer of Amish fiction, says, "When people read my books, it takes them to a simpler way of life. Hanging clothes on the line, cooking meals from scratch, turning off the television and mobile phones and just visiting. We've lost that way of life. I think my readers are craving that."
As a genre Amish romance novels have flourished over the last decade and a half. Wanda Brunstetter, writer of Amish fiction, says, "When people read my books, it takes them to a simpler way of life. Hanging clothes on the line, cooking meals from scratch, turning off the television and mobile phones and just visiting. We've lost that way of life. I think my readers are craving that."
Joanna Kurtz, always the bridesmaid, never the bride. For now. Joanna has a few secrets of her own that she tries to keep under wraps. Like the fact that she loves to write and desperately wants to be published, something that just isn't done in her Pennsylvania community. She also has someone courting her that no one knows about, a secret she holds close to her heart. Eben Troyer lives in the Shipshewana, Indiana Amish community and since his only brother joined the English world, it's up to him to take over the farm. Will he and Joanna ever be together?
While primarily written for and marketed to adult readers, some young adult Amish romance titles have been published as well.[3] According to a September 2013 Library Journal survey, Amish fiction is the most commonly carried subgenre of Christian fiction in public libraries, although the survey did not distinguish between Amish romance and other Amish-themed literature.[7]
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