Years ago, Emma Keim's husband Sanford passed away, leaving her heartbroken and alone to raise her three daughters. Her family hasn't been quiet about the fact that they expect her to stay a window, but meeting Jay Hilty a fellow single parent and widower, changes something within her. Jay feels it too. Watching his oldest son become engaged and the joy it brings him makes Jay question if it's time to finally move on.
Thanks for sharing that real world example, Frank. Yes these ads seem disconnected from reality. As I wrote, the only positive spin I could come up with is maybe it’s for someone who would want to create a few plots or one novel for very little pay just to get the experience before moving to something better. Just looking at rates for genre writers on the same site, the hourly rate for many is as much or more than the price offered for one plot by this company. https://www.upwork.com/hire/romance-writers/
Joanna Kurtz, always the bridesmaid, never the bride. For now. Joanna has a few secrets of her own that she tries to keep under wraps. Like the fact that she loves to write and desperately wants to be published, something that just isn't done in her Pennsylvania community. She also has someone courting her that no one knows about, a secret she holds close to her heart. Eben Troyer lives in the Shipshewana, Indiana Amish community and since his only brother joined the English world, it's up to him to take over the farm. Will he and Joanna ever be together?

Isaac Byler grew up in the Amish community of Zebulon, Minnesota. Because their community doesn't have the rumspringa common in other communities, it means Isaac will soon need join the church and find a woman to marry, something that just feels wrong to him for unexplained reasons. David Lantz is left supporting his mother and sisters after tragedy strikes. When he takes Isaac on as his apprentice, an attraction grows between them and they will be forced to reconcile their feelings and their faith.
As a genre Amish romance novels have flourished over the last decade and a half. Wanda Brunstetter, writer of Amish fiction, says, "When people read my books, it takes them to a simpler way of life. Hanging clothes on the line, cooking meals from scratch, turning off the television and mobile phones and just visiting. We've lost that way of life. I think my readers are craving that."
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