Most works of Amish romance have protagonists with socially conservative values, especially chastity, who engage in romance in ways which are socially and religiously acceptable in their communities.[5] Similar works may also feature other religious minorities, such as Mennonites, Shakers, or Puritans. Unlike many mainstream romance novels, Amish romance novels do not rely on the portrayal of sex and most other forms of physical intimacy.[2] "Despite the suggestion by some that the appeal of Amish fiction must lie in the arousal of coverings coming off, or suspenders being suspended — hence the coy industry term 'bonnet rippers' — most Amish novels are as different from Fifty Shades of Grey as a cape dress is from a spiked collar."[5]
I have not yet read an Amish fiction that has not spoken to my heart and my spirit. Oh to have lived during the times I read about in the books. I am so captivated by thier faith and how every deed and thought is with a mind to What would God do. I have been reading Amish Fiction for the last 6 months along with my Bible and can't make myself focus on some of the other materials I used to love to read. I am so captivated I just recently purchased a building for a small busines that I have. My building was constructed by the Amish in GA. That alone was the deciding factor.
It's difficult being different in the Amish community, something Sarah and Miriam know all too well. Once, Sarah fell in love with an English woman and, realizing what that meant, withdrew into herself until Miriam walked into her life. Miriam was torn between trying to love a man she saw only as a brother and attempting figuring out what her heart truly wanted. Lesbians in the Amish community end up shunned, but that's a risk they're willing to take to be together.
The genre has proven lucrative for publishers,[2][3][4] many of which are Christian publishers, such as Bethany House, Thomas Nelson, and Zondervan.[5] The first commercially successful Amish romance novel, according to writer Valerie Weaver-Zercher, was Beverly Lewis' The Shunning, published in 1997 by Bethany House.[5] In addition, over 150 Amish fiction e-books were self-published between 2010 and 2013.[6] The three most successful authors of Amish romance—Beverly Lewis, Cindy Woodsmall, and Wanda Brunstetter—have sold over 24 million books.[6]
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