Isaac Byler grew up in the Amish community of Zebulon, Minnesota. Because their community doesn't have the rumspringa common in other communities, it means Isaac will soon need join the church and find a woman to marry, something that just feels wrong to him for unexplained reasons. David Lantz is left supporting his mother and sisters after tragedy strikes. When he takes Isaac on as his apprentice, an attraction grows between them and they will be forced to reconcile their feelings and their faith.
I am very interested in Amish fiction, but I am kind of a wimp about buggy crashes, or too much death and sadness. So I gave up on reading them because it seemed like the authors always used that to bring excitement to what would otherwise be a rather plain life. I'm interested in the simple joys and trials of life. What would you say are the gentlest Amish books you have read? Something more along the lines of the Little House books where the troubles are usually related to crop failure etc. instead of tragedy...
Julia Bradford thought the worst day of her life was the day her son witnesses a gang shooting, forcing them to enter witness protection. Living with Abraham King on his Amish farm is a huge change for Julia, but she finds herself drawn to their peaceful way of living. And to Abraham. The actual worst day of Julia's life is when her family gets tracked down by those that wish to harm them. Will they survive...together?
Most works of Amish romance have protagonists with socially conservative values, especially chastity, who engage in romance in ways which are socially and religiously acceptable in their communities.[5] Similar works may also feature other religious minorities, such as Mennonites, Shakers, or Puritans. Unlike many mainstream romance novels, Amish romance novels do not rely on the portrayal of sex and most other forms of physical intimacy.[2] "Despite the suggestion by some that the appeal of Amish fiction must lie in the arousal of coverings coming off, or suspenders being suspended — hence the coy industry term 'bonnet rippers' — most Amish novels are as different from Fifty Shades of Grey as a cape dress is from a spiked collar."[5]
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